Can You Keep a Secret? Protecting your company through non-compete and non-solicitation agreements

February 12, 2014
Webinar
In the wake of modern employment trends, employers are confronted with the practical reality that long-term employees have become the exception rather than the general rule. Employees move from one employer to the next — often to a competitor — where they may utilize confidential information gained from a previous employer.

Employers can help protect their businesses from unfair competition when they use well-prepared non-compete and non-solicitation agreements. In this 60-minute Employer’s Toolkit webinar, Mike Mattingly and Corey Asay discussed appropriate drafting and implementation, the effective legal limits of these documents in protecting your trade secrets and confidential information, and best practices relating to non-compete litigation.

Click here to download the recording and PowerPoint slides.

Featuring

Michael B. Mattingly | Associate
Mike is an enthusiastic and entertaining presenter on employment law. His military background enables him to provide a unique perspective on employment issues, specifically the nuances of the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) and the challenges it presents to employers. He understands challenges of military men and women reentering the workforce from both viewpoints — and he has the leadership and management capabilities necessary to practically work through disputes.

J. Corey Asay
 | Associate
Corey works with local businesses as well as large national companies dealing with non-competition agreements, the misappropriation of trade secrets, and the False Claims Act. He takes a practical and calculated approach to working with employers, whether investigating claims, interviewing witnesses, or drafting responses to charges. He thoroughly examines all angles of a matter before advising the client on the appropriate strategy, whether it’s negotiating a settlement, participating in mediation, or pursuing litigation.